• Inclusivity,  Instructional / Course Design,  Remote Teaching

    Building Community, Remotely

    In an online remote context, virtual learning communities (VLCs) allow us to plan for: Interaction Communication Collaboration This video highlights some of the reasons we might want to develop rich VLCs in remote teaching. Below are some strategies framed from instructor competencies. Some strategies for developing interaction: Model participation and practice good nettiquette Use Discussion Forums and participate actively Steer conversations in the right direction Motivate and encourage Create a safe and supportive environment/network  Moderate Discussion forum  Temper the dominant voices in the forum Set the tone by being positive Encourage and motivate students Use introductions, online office hours and e-mail to promote interaction Incorporate collaborative learning and increased opportunities…

  • Inclusivity,  Instructional / Course Design,  Instructional Strategies,  Internationalization

    How do I internationalize my course?

    Self-reflection Step 1: Know my position and privilege. Who am I as a teacher? (This idea isn’t new, check out this article from 1958: Teacher, Know Thyself) Step 2: Does the way I design my course plan for access and diversity? Step 3: Do I want to “add-on”, “infuse”, or “transform” my course through internationalization? Some direction If you are working on step 3, there is an excellent resource of teaching tips here: Strategies for Course Internationalization. Centre for Teaching Excellence, University of Waterloo. A simple way to start internationalization is to add assigned readings from international perspectives. This can be a way to start conversations and look for similarities and…

  • Educational Technology,  General,  Instructional Strategies,  Open

    WikiProjects, Article Importance, and Article Quality: An Intimate Relationship (1/2)

    By John Kleefeld [social-bio] In a previous post, I wrote about how WikiProject Medicine acts as a forum for determining the priority (also called importance) of specific health-related Wikipedia articles and assessing their quality (also called class). More generally, these three concepts—WikiProjects, article importance, and article quality—are crucial for instructors and students to understand if they seek to use course-based assignments to improve Wikipedia. I will address each of them in turn. WikiProjects A WikiProject comprises a group of collaborators who aim to achieve specific Wikipedia editing goals, or to achieve goals in a specific subject or discipline represented in Wikipedia. An example of an editing type of project is…

  • General,  Instructional Strategies

    Tools and Strategies for ‘Hot Topics’ – Part 2 of 3

    By Tereigh Ewert During Class A favorite strategy of mine has long been the “oops” and “ouch” strategy. I’m fairly certain I encountered it at a conference, but an Internet search doesn’t reveal who first developed the strategy. In English slang, the word “ouch” means “that hurt me.” The word “oops” means, “I made a mistake” (I like to define these terms in class, in case they are not familiar to some students). In the “The Oops and Ouch” strategy, students can express themselves in two ways. If they feel uncomfortable with something that has been said in a class or a conversation, saying “ouch” alerts their peer(s) (or instructor)…

  • Educational Technology,  General,  Instructional / Course Design,  Instructional Strategies

    Using Forums Effectively: Ways to improve engagement

    [social_share/] [social-bio] By Katharine Horne This post originally appeared on the University of Sussex Technology Enhanced Learning Blog. It is being republished here with permission. In a Virtual Learning Environment such as Study Direct (Moodle), forums can be a great way to share course information, build community and allow students to easily share resources and ideas. Last year our post The benefits of lurking in higher education explored the ways in which learners engage with forums. However, often these forums can seem quite sparse and neglected. So how can we encourage students to actively engage with forums? Below are a few key tips to help you make the most of…

  • Assessment and Evaluation

    Evaluating Presentations With a Little Help From My (Citable) Friends …

    [social_share/] [social-bio]   By Carolyn Hoessler Individual and group presentations provide great opportunity for students to share what they have learned with peers and an efficient and feasible way of marking for instructors. That being said, how do you grade them? I, and I’m pretty sure you too, have experienced the full range of presentations from the stunningly excellent to the staggeringly confusing, from the inspirational to the sleep-inducing. The challenge is describing these qualities so they can be identified and assessed. One option would be to create my own rubric based on these experiences. The easier option is to use or adapt existing materials from others I respect. The…