Promoting Peer to Peer Participation

Remote Teaching and Learning does not need to be a self isolating experience for your students. Although we’re all working from home and keeping our distance there’s no reason we can’t work together. In this post we’ll give you few ideas and tools to get students interacting with peer to peer activities and supports.

Peer Support Discussion Forum

Often students’ questions about class get answered in the informal moments before and after class when students run into each other in the hallway or out in the bowl.

“Hey aren’t you in my History class? Do you know understand what we need to do for the second writing assignment?”

But without that physical opportunity for happenstance, you may find one of two things happening:

  1. You’re either fielding a LOT more emails than you’re used to (mostly about things that are in the Syllabus) OR
  2. Students are finding themselves in the dark and NOT asking the question at all, which is far worse.

At the Distance Education Unit we simply create a digital space for happenstance in the Discussion Forums of the Learning Management System. Creating a “Questions Lounge” forum of some sort allows students to have a place to ask those general questions about the course. This serves several functions in the online environment.

  1. It allows those eager and engaged students to jump in and support their peers. There’s always a few students who love this role. Having students support each other in this way means you’ll probably only have to monitor this feed and not answer every post. Just make sure that the answers coming in are correct and otherwise facilitate any questions that need your attention.
  2. By centralizing these responses, you’ll probably answer the question for more students than you think as their peers begin to build a FAQ of sorts that ends up helping more than just one student.
  3. It’s a good review process for your course design. If there are consistent questions about one assignment or aspect of your course perhaps it’s your explanation that needs to be addressed for next term. This forum can help identify aspects of your course that may not be clearly articulated.

Here’s a link to some help on how to set up a discussion forum in Blackboard.

Groups

There’s lots of ways to use groups in your remote teaching and learning class. It doesn’t always need to be a formal assignment. Think of all the ways you ask students to interact during class. Many of these opportunities exist online. Here’s a few ways to use Groups:

  1. Simple study groups – especially useful if you have a large class. Breaking students into smaller groups can mean that students can form a tighter group with whom to rely on when major assignments or exams are on the horizon. Building some type of learning activities early on in the term to encourage students to engage with peers is an important to the success of this type of peer group.
  2. Case-study – Giving students a specific case study to work through together can get them supporting each others learning. Have students discuss a case study with guided questions in the group discussion forums and give each group a summary question to formulate a response to. These responses can then be shared with the larger class in the main class discussion forum.
  3. Jigsaw – Jigsaws allow you to break up readings or other large chunks of content and assign them to groups of students. These groups then summarize the content for the rest of the class and synthesize how it relates to objectives and topics in that weeks learning materials. Presented back to the class, every students gets the benefit of the content and also a peer to peer interaction.

    Peer Reviews

Having your peers provide honest feedback on you drafts can be invaluable. You can set up a Peer Review system in your course in a number of different ways. The simplest way would be for students to post their drafts in a Discussion Forum (either the full class tool or within a group) and have their peers provide feedback through the replies on that post. There’s very little setup required for this method making it quick and easy.

Blackboard does have a Peer Review Tool that allows you to set up a more formal process where students can provide feedback similarly to how an instructor would do for a formal assignment.

For instructions on setting this up in Blackboard, follow this Link.

Remote Teaching with Video

Keeping your course fresh and interesting throughout the term can be challenging in an online environment. Especially if you’ve had to rush to prepare a remote teaching version of an otherwise live course. One of the many ways we can keep things interesting is with the use of video. Students will appreciate the opportunity to break-up their readings with some media.

Here’s a few creative ways you might use video in your remote or online class yet this term.

Guest Lecture Videos

What is it?
Inviting a guest speaker into your class might be an effective strategy to bring an author’s first hand experience into your class, to discuss a recent development in your discipline with another leading expert, or to bring in alternative perspectives on a topic.

  • You might consider inviting:
  • a guest with a specific field experience to share with the students
  • another faculty member or researcher
  • graduate student(s)
  • someone currently working as a professional in the discipline
  • an author
Why Consider it?
Inviting a guest speaker goes beyond demonstrating collegiality to your students, there are a number of reasons you might consider inviting a guest speaker. Guest speakers can:
  • provide alternative perspectives to topics and issues in your course
  • bring insights from the field into the classroom
  • demonstrate a skill or process
  • provide further expertise on specific topics
  • share key findings from a project or initiative they have worked with
  • supplement and enhance resources available in the course
  • co‐teach a case study
  • provide feedback on student work via a Judging Panel
  • just-in-time information and skills

However, you should keep in mind that making the most of a guest speaker in your classroom requires careful planning. One of the first decisions you will need to make is how you would like the guest speaker to participate in your class (e.g. as a presenter, a discussion facilitator, a recording, etc.)

Tools for the Job

  • WebEx – The University of Saskatchewan has a site wide license for this web conferencing application which allows you to: stream live audio and video, use chats and collaborative whiteboards, and share presentations.
  • Skype – This is a free* and commonly used mobile and desktop application
  • Google Hangouts – For instructors and participants who have a Google account, Hangouts allows up to 10 participants to conference with live audio and video, chat, share screens, etc.
  • YouTube Live – For larger groups with less interaction from the audience YouTube Live allows you to stream audio and video, record sessions, and share the live broadcast publicly or to specific people.
  • Screencast-o-matic – This free* desktop application allows you to record audio and video to a file. This tool works well for recorded lectures which could be used repeatedly. It can record the presenter’s screen, the presenter, or both.
Tips and Tricks
Preparing your guest

Consider discussion the following with your guest prior to their session or recording:

  • what are the learning objectives for the module and for the session or recording?
  • what are your expectations for the format and duration of the session or recording?
  • are handouts required/will students need a copy of the presentation?
  • what instructional strategies could the guest employ?
  • what setup or support is required?
  • will the session be recorded? (why or why not?)
  • provide adequate lead time
  • obtain a bio for the guest
  • describe your class size and characteristics
  • determine roles and responsibilities
  • can/should students be able to contact the guest ahead of time or after?

Preparing your students

Consider discussion the following with your students prior to the session or viewing the recording:

  • what are the learning objectives for the module and for the session or recording?
  • what are your expectations for the students?
    • e.g. prepare questions, check for understanding, related task
  • how will you facilitate discussion between students and the guest?

 

Course Trailers & Intro Videos

What is it?
You have likely seen movie trailers; those short videos that are designed to capture the interest of the audience to get them interested in seeing movies. You may want to consider creating your own course trailer. Create a short video that would give learners a quick glimpse of your course and the connections you hope to make throughout the semester.
Why Consider This?
“It’s not the technology. It’s not the way something looks. It’s the story.” – John Lasseter, PIXAR

In the course trailer video you can introduce yourself, the course description, the course objectives and topics. For this particular video type you might consider completing some, or all, of the following statements:

  • Do you like…
  • Are you interested in…
  • Are you concerned about…
  • Do you want to…
  • By participating in this class…
  • We will look at…
  • Join us as we investigate/explore…

A course trailer would be an opportunity to introduce yourself to learners.  Sharing course outcomes could also be done here.  Think about inviting learners to participate and become part of this learning community.

Think about including campus and classroom footage as a way for distance learners to gain a sense of connection to the institution. You may also want to have a final statement that invites learners to participate, create and explore.

Tools for the Job

We can help!

If you are interested in creating a trailer for your distance course, contact your instructional designer at DEU.

Take the plunge!

If you would like to create your own trailer, a few of the following tools might be helpful:

Camtasia– This nonlinear digital video editing software is somewhere between entry level and professional levels. You can splice together audio and video as you need, insert graphics and titles, as well as a few other interactions. Available for both Windows and Mac OS. Camtasia Tutorials

Screencast-O-Matic– This software is available for both Windows and Mac OS, and has a free as well as a Pro version. At the push of a button you can begin to record right from your webcam, what’s on the screen, or both. When you’re done recording it can export the video to your desktop or even straight to your YouTube account. Screencast-o-matic Tutorial 1 Tutorial 2.

GoAnimate – This online animation tool offers a wide range of assets to create comprehensive animations. They offer paid plans and a 14 day free trial. Tutorial

PowToon – This popular online animation software offers both free and pro versions. It comes with a series of sample music and images you can use for creating engaging animations. Tutorial

Explain Everything – This mobile app is available for iOS, Android, and Windows. Record voice and animations using the assets provided or insert your own! When you’re done simply export the video to upload to the LMS or your Website. Tutorials

Educreations – This mobile app is available for iOS. Record voice and animations using the assets provided or insert your own! When you’re done share the video with classes, embed it in a website, share it on Facebook or Twitter, or export it. Free and paid versions available. Tutorial

Tips and Tricks

A Few Practical Guidelines

Creating a Storyboard
After drafting your storyboard review the topic(s) and learning outcomes. If everything adequately presented? Is there anything present on the storyboard that is not explicitly related to the topic(s) or learning outcomes? If so, why is that content present and would it be missed if omitted?

Audio
Speech – narration does not necessarily need to be written word for word on a storyboard. However, providing more detail will make the recording process much easier, even if you do not repeat it word for word. Attempting to “wing it” often results in multiple takes and wasted time. For more information about recording audio see Tips for Recording Narrations.
Sound bites can add realism, generate emotion, define space, depict identity, set the pace, symbolize meaning, and unify transitions. However, they should not be overused as they can distract the learner and increase cognitive load.

Visuals
Imagery should be self explanatory, simple, at the learner’s level, match it’s purpose, and be relevant to the scene/objective/narrative. In your storyboard you might simply provide a short description,  sketch, table or figure number or title, or a copy of the visuals that are to be on the screen. For more information about selecting types of visuals see A Picture Is Worth 1,000 Words: Using Visuals.

Video
Is most effective when the combination of audio and visuals is carefully considered and planned. Storyboarding will help you to identify if there is too much information being presented to the learner at one time (through audio or video) and avoid cognitive overload. Consider the pacing (rate of information), and transitions between ideas and what the learner is seeing and hearing. A general guideline for length is to keep the videos in your course around 6 minutes in length. However, this may vary slightly depending on the purpose and content of the video (e.g. a narrative story may take longer than 6 minutes to complete, but can still be engaging for its entire duration). The key is to make sure the video is no longer than is needed.

USask DEU Examples

Student Made Videos

This video was created by students for a Distance Education offering of Women and Gender Studies (WGST) 210.3. It went viral and to date has over  4,000,000 views and even had an article written about it at ominocity.com .

What is it?
You are likely already familiar with video technology. You may already enjoy making video recordings of personal events in your life. For a digital analysis, online presentations, or other assignments, you may be producing your response as a short video. Knowledge and skills in the domain of digital literacy are critical here, so we have provided some resources to help you on your way.

It is important to also mention that for these types of assignments, knowledge and skills around copyright, open licensing, information sharing, digital footprints, and managing your online presence should be well understood by anyone creating, adapting, using, or contributing to, creative works via the world wide web.

Using Licensed Materials in Your Work
Often when creating videos and presentations we are inclined to include quotes, images, audio and video clips, and other media that we did not create ourselves. There are a variety of ways that students can include third-party work in their videos and presentations, but it is critical to consider copyright and intellectual property implications of doing so. The following links provide some support in navigating the rules and guidelines for using third-party materials in your work:

Creative Common Licenses Explained
Canadian Copyright Act
U of S Copyright Information

Applying Open License to Your Work

Open Licensing Resources

Where should I publish my Open Content?
Creative Commons publishing communities by content format – http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Publish

How do I mark my work with an Open License?
Creative Commons Licensing and Marking Your Content

Choose a License that works for you
Creative Common Licenses Explained – http://creativecommons.org/licenses/

Tools for the Job

Desktop and Laptop

Panopto – USask supported video production and post production tools on campus. Check out this blog post from GMCTL about student videos using Panopto https://words.usask.ca/gmcte/2020/03/17/panopto-for-student-presentations/

Camtasia – This nonlinear digital video editing software is somewhere between entry level and professional levels. You can splice together audio and video as you need, insert graphics and titles, as well as a few other interactions. Available for both Windows and Mac OS. Camtasia Tutorials

iMovie – This is Apple’s entry level video editing software and is available for both Mac OS and iOS. If you’re new to video editing you may want to get your feet wet by trying this software first.

Screencast-O-Matic – This software is available for both Windows and Mac OS, and has a free as well as a Pro version. At the push of a button you can begin to record right from your webcam, what’s on the screen, or both. When you’re done recording it can export the video to your desktop or even straight to your YouTube account. Screencast-o-matic Tutorial 1 Tutorial 2.

PowerPoint – A little known secret about PowerPoint is that you can record audio and creating a timed video slideshow without any other software. If you want to get started on voiceover slideshows, don’t want to spend any money on software, and don’t have time to learn a nonlinear digital video editing software this might be your best bet. Written Tutorial Video Tutorial

Keynote – A little known secret about Keynote is that you can record audio and creating a timed video slideshow without any other software. If you want to get started on voiceover slideshows, don’t want to spend any money on software, and don’t have time to learn a nonlinear digital video editing software this might be your best bet. Tutorial

Windows Movie Maker – This is Microsoft’s entry level video editing software and is available for Windows. If you’re new to video editing you may want to get your feet wet by trying this software first.

GoAnimate – This online animation tool offers a wide range of assets to create comprehensive animations. They offer paid plans and a 14 day free trial. Tutorial

Voki – A little camera shy? Not to worry, with Voki you can create an avatar and use their text to speech software for narration. Don’t like the robot voice? You can also upload audio files or record straight into Voki. Free and paid plans are available. Tutorial

PowToon – This popular online animation software offers both free and pro versions. It comes with a series of sample music and images you can use for creating engaging animations. Tutorial

Mobile

Explain Everything – This mobile app is available for iOS, Android, and Windows. Record voice and animations using the assets provided or insert your own! When you’re done simply export the video to upload to the LMS or your Website. Tutorials

ShowMe – This mobile app is available for iOS. Record voice and animations using the assets provided or insert your own! When you’re done simply export the video to upload to the LMS,your Website, or the ShowME community. Tutorial

Educreations – This mobile app is available for iOS. Record voice and animations using the assets provided or insert your own! When you’re done share the video with classes, embed it in a website, share it on Facebook or Twitter, or export it. Free and paid versions available. Tutorial

Clarisketch – This application is available for Android and Chrome. Record voice, images, sketches, and annotate as you go. When complete, it does not create a video file, but instead a small media format that can play in any browser. You can share your finished clarisketch via social media, email, and more. Short tutorial. Longer tutorial.

Planning Resources

A Few Practical Guidelines

Creating a Storyboard
After drafting your storyboard review the assignment instructions. Is everything adequately presented? Is there anything present on the storyboard that is not explicitly related to the assignment? If so, why is that content present and would it be missed if omitted? Sample storyboard template

Audio
Speech – narration does not necessarily need to be written word for word on a storyboard. However, providing more detail will make the recording process much easier, even if you do not repeat it word for word. Attempting to “wing it” often results in multiple takes and wasted time.
Sound bites can add realism, generate emotion, define space, depict identity, set the pace, symbolize meaning, and unify transitions. However, they should not be overused as they can distract the learner and increase cognitive load.

Visuals
Imagery should be self explanatory, simple, at the learner’s level, match it’s purpose, and be relevant to the scene/objective/narrative. In your storyboard you might simply provide a short description, sketch, table or figure number or title, or a copy of the visuals that are to be on the screen. For more information about selecting types of visuals see A Picture Is Worth 1,000 Words: Using Visuals.

Video
Is most effective when the combination of audio and visuals is carefully considered and planned. Storyboarding will help you to identify if there is too much information being presented to the learner at one time (through audio or video) and avoid cognitive overload. Consider the pacing (rate of information), and transitions between ideas and what the learner is seeing and hearing. Video durations may vary slightly depending on the purpose and content of the video (e.g. a narrative story may take longer than 6 minutes to complete, but can still be engaging for its entire duration). The key is to make sure the video is no longer than is needed.

Lecture Videos

Perhaps you just want to make some lecture videos to send out or add to your Remote Teaching course materials. Here’s a link to a previous blog post we did to help you think through the process and get the most out of your lecture videos!

So You’d Like to Make a Lecture Video …

Class Communications at a Distance

Communicating with your students is the number one way to keep them on track and engaged in the topic of your course. But when the physical classroom is not an option how do we keep the lines of communication open between the instructor, the students, and their peers?

Here’s some tips and tools for making sure you’re keeping the communication lines open.

Before the start of class

  • Make sure your University email address is provided in a prominent place of the class syllabus. This will ensure students can message you with questions or concerns.
    • *Note: You can have your University email forwarded to another email address if your primary email is something else.
  • You might also provide a phone number and some “virtual office hours” when it would be appropriate for students to call.
    • *Note: You can have your office line forwarded to a cell phone or home line during campus closures which ensures you’re not sharing personal phone numbers.
  • Speaking of Virtual Office Hours, you may want to schedule a WebEx session each week where you are available for drop-ins and informal Q&A.
  • Create a FAQ in the Blackboard Learn Discussions tool and maintain it throughout the term.
  • Create and schedule Announcements in Blackboard for things like reminders, due dates and other planned events within your class schedule. This will save you time later in the term and ensure you don’t forget to send them.
  • Create a welcome video for the landing page of the course. This ensures that whenever students arrive to class for the first time they’re greeted by their instructor. This can just be a quick webcam hello with some instructions as to how to navigate the menu items or you might want to create a course trailer to really get students excited about being part of the learning community.

First Week of Class

  • Email students through the Email Tool in Blackboard at the start of class. You can welcome them to the class, set up expectations about how long they can expect to wait for a reply to their email questions and generally just say, Hi! This is more about confirming that there is in fact a live instructor facilitating and guiding this experience.
  • Setting up a who’s who chat inside the Discussion Forums can also get students interacting with peers and practicing with some tools before you get too deep. Have students post something interesting about themselves or something of interest to them and get people talking.

Throughout the Term

  • Discussion Forums can be vibrant exciting places to engage with peers and materials in an online class. They can also be a painful and often dreaded experience for students and instructors alike. The trick is to make the discussions purposeful. Follow this link to some resources around how to design interesting and engaging discussion activities.

Also here is a video you might use to show students the importance of online discussions.

  • Synchronous Activities are a great way to communicate with students throughout the year. Case studies, debates, open Q&A’s, guest lecturers and more can all participate together in web conferencing platforms like WebEx. See this link to find more ideas and tools to use for synchronous activities.
  • Announcements are a great way to share current events relevant to the class material, provide wrap-up or summary of discussions or activities, or provide student with other relevant information about job postings or extra curricular opportunities in your field of study. Keeping in contact throughout the term makes students feel more connected to their online learning community.

Feedback

  • Providing Feedback for assignments and activities is always important in helping students know how their learning journey is going. It’s especially important that you not only provide a number of formative assessment opportunities for students throughout the term, whether it be review questions and answers or self check activities, but also that you provide them with personal feedback on major assignments. Although this can be done as written comments and track changes on a document, consider creating a short video that outlines your comments and recommendations to add a personal touch.

Audio and Video creations

  • Creating Audio and Video content is easier than ever and doing so shows off your personality in a way that asynchronous discussion forums and announcements just can’t match. Panopto makes is simple to record and share video files with your class and even embed quizzes and activities right in the player. Demos, interviews, wrap-up’s and more can all help students better understand the written materials with added context.
  • Students can create videos too. Use Panopto to create a video assignment for students. Design a poster presentation assignment or just have students take the class through a webtour of an online resource. There are lots of ways students can make use of video in class to better communicate with everyone.

In the end, communicating with your students is all about creating a healthy online learning community. Click this link to learn more about how to create a Healthy Virtual Learning Community

Additional Resources:

Developing Effective Online Communication Plans – https://openpress.usask.ca/ideabook/chapter/communication-plans/

Utilizing Social Learning in Online Courses – https://openpress.usask.ca/onlinelearning/chapter/chapter-11-utilizing-social-learning-in-online-courses/

Humanizing Online Teaching and Learning – https://openpress.usask.ca/humanmooc/

 

Creating Engaging Learning Activities

In order to cross over from passive content consumption into active learning, you will need to make real-life activities the focus of your course content (Hayes, 2015). Activities can be discussions, interactive activities, project or problem based assignments, blogging, and curation assignments – or could even involve learners themselves creating content and activities such as editing Wikipedia.

Connecting Activities to Your Course Design

Planning activities while creating your Course Design Plan is not a very complex concept once you have examined all of the foundations, but many people will create online courses without putting much thought at all into it, and then wonder why they do not even come close to getting the results they desire from their courses. Your instructional designer will assist you in planning using five basic steps:

  • Determine the Main Design Model for the Course (Independent Community, Guided Community, Networked Community, etc). Ask yourself “What is the main reason for the model I selected?” and “What other approaches could also possibly be part of the course design?” It is okay to have mixtures of others, but thinking through that may make you reconsider the main one.
  • Determine the Main Teaching Philosophy for the Course (Pedagogy, Andragogy, Heutagogy, etc). Ask yourself “What is the main reason for the philosophy I selected?” and “What other philosophies could also possibly be part of the course design?” Again, it is okay to have mixtures of approaches, but thinking through that may make you reconsider the main one.
  • Make a List of Interactions and Communications You Think Would Be Utilized in the Course. This may be a short list (even a list of one) or a long list. Then, next to each type of interaction or communication, identify the design model and teaching philosophy you want to use with each. Use this list to re-evaluate numbers one and two.
  • Create a Map of the Activities You Would Like in the Course. Start listing the activities (or activity ideas) that you want in your course. The fine details of the activity or the specific mechanics are not absolutely necessary at this time. Then connect those with a the design model and teaching philosophy for each item in the list. This process may cause you to revise previous steps, or even the map of activities. Finally, match your activities to your learning objectives (and make sure there are no gaps), order the list, and begin plugging it into the Course Design Plan.
  • Identify the tools and basic mechanics of the learning activity. The final step is to select the tools you want to use in your course. Often times people start with this step, which is not necessarily incorrect, but caution should be used. If beginning with this step ensure you revisit steps one through four. This process may cause you to revise previous steps, or choose a different tool. A brief introduction to types of tools is included below, and your instructional designer can help with this process as well.

As you can see, this process requires a lot of looking at different parts and revising as analysis reveals missing elements or incorrect identifications. For example, a list of assignments may reveal that you desire to have mostly heutagogical networked activities where you previously identified instructivist pedagogical student-instructor interaction as your course structure. This should lead you to reconsider the overall structure of the course (or to redesign the activities to match the existing structure).

For a more detailed look at this process, as well as a helpful worksheet for the steps listed above, see “From Instructivism to Connectivism: Theoretical Underpinnings of MOOCs

Learning Platform-Specific Tools

Most course platforms have several categories of assessments and tools that range from standard online activities to innovative technology-driven interaction. The exact tools you have access to will vary based on the one you are using, in our case Blackboard Learn. Becoming familiar with these activities before you design will help you actively imagine where they could be utilized in your class. Your instructional designer can assist you in selecting the best tool for your activity and in designing the activity for the online learning environment.

Student-Student & Student-Instructor Interaction Tools

  • Discussion Board: The term discussion tends to conjure images of classroom based activity, or a traditional online format of “post once reply twice”. While these formats can be effective uses of the tool, there are many different ways this tool can be used to engage students by choosing different activity structures or formats. You should become familiar with how some discussion activities are different in than the typical threaded discussion.
  • Peer Assessment: While the tool in the LMS is called Self and Peer Assessment the value of using this tool is in providing opportunities for formative feedback. Students’ quality of writing tends to increase when they are writing for broader audiences as well as when they are required to provide feedback to their peers. You should become familiar with how different peer review activities could play a role in your could assignments.
  • Wiki: The wiki tool in the LMS can be either a class wide collaboration tool, or a group based tool. It allows students to contribute to a central location rather than distributing ideas and content across multiple discussion threads. It also provides a convenient space for students to coordinate activity, such as a sign up list. Note that any content added in wiki pages in the LMS are deleted in the course copy process.
  • Journals: There may be certain activities where students are working on term long projects, or need a space to reflect on their activity in your course. The journals provide an opportunity for students to collect reflections, share them with the instructor, and receive feedback without the content being available to other students in the course.

Student-Content Interaction Tools

  • Quizzes/Tests: These tools often have different names, but the general idea is that they are basically online test questions. These are in a separate area as a standard “test.” These can also be used as informal or ungraded polls to gauge learner interest or feedback. For example, if you are using the DEU Module Template, then this tool is very useful for the Review Questions, and Self-Test sections.

External Tools

Of course, you are also free to use blogs and other external tools in your course as either the main focus of connectivist learning or as a supplement to the content you create. Your instructional designer should also be familiar with using these tools in an online course. A few examples include:

WordPress: Either a course site can be created as an activity hub for the class, or students can create their own blogs as a place to create and maintain assignments, reflections, etc.

Confluence Wiki: Although wikis were mentioned in a previous section, this UofS hosted wiki platform will retain information created in it from term to term. If you plan to have students contributing to a central knowledge base from term to term this might be the tool for you.

Academic Video (Panopto): You can use panopto to deliver, stream, or create videos for use in your course. You can also use it as an assignment or activity tool for students to submit their own videos. For example, if you have an introduction discussion forum, you may ask students to submit a brief video introducing themselves to the class.

There are many more tools that can be integrated into your course than can be listed here. See DEU Digital Learning Tools and Ideas for an up-to-date list of tools and samples for more.

How to Choose From Various Similar Tools

[Adopted from “The Confusion Over a Little Thing Called Blog” by Matt Crosslin, published in the former MoodleZine Online Journal, July 2006]

When looking at the various tools that are available to you in a course, you will notice that there are many similarities between various tools. For example, when it comes down to it, many tools like blogs, journals, and discussion boards are all forms of personal publication that have similar core components: Genesis, Input, Interface, and Feedback.

Ultimately, the differences between various tools may not matter for your desired assignment, or it may mean the difference between a confusing activity and a successful activity. The important take away from this section is to think through exactly what you want to accomplish with any given activity, and then find a tool to match your intended goals.


References

Hayes, S. (2015). MOOCs and Quality: A review of the recent literature. Retrieved from http://eprints.aston.ac.uk/26604/1/MOOCs_and_quality_a_review_of_the_recent_literature.pdf

Attribution

This post is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical 4.0 License and contains content from a variety of sources published under a variety of open licenses, including: